Technical Reports

These technical reports are part of the Red Wolf Management Series published by the USFWS.

Title and Description
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Parker, Warren T. A Plan for Re-Establishing the Red Wolf on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina (February 1987). [23 pages, 12.7 Mb]This technical report has been prepared to serve as a planning guide for the eventual reintroduction of a small number of self-sustaining populations of endangered red wolves (Canis rufus) within the species’ historic range. The particular site this proposal is tailored for is the lands that presently comprise the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in Dare County, North Carolina.
Parker, Warren T. A Strategy for Establishing and Utilizing Red Wolf Populations on Islands (February 1987). [10 pages, 4.2 Mb]The reintroduction of the endangered red wolf to selected mainland areas within its historic range is the only means by which the species can be recovered. The Red Wolf Recovery Plan calls for the establishment of three self-sustaining populations before the species could be considered for possible down-listing to threatened status. The Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge reintroduction project in North Carolina will hopefully develop into the first successful mainland population of red wolves. Development of other major sites will be a major effort that likely will span long periods of time.
Parker, Warren T. A Historic Perspective of Canis Rufus and its Recovery Potential (May 1988). [20 pages, 11.7 Mb]The long-range objective of the Red Wolf Recovery program has always been to reintroduce this extinct-in-the-wild species into portions of its historic range. The red wolf has been characterized by several writers as the “Flying Dutchman” of the wildlife world—a species that has sought a safe haven since the mid-1970s. This report has been prepared in an effort to bring forward the latest information available on the historical status of the species, the various factors that led to its ultimate demise in the wild, and the efforts being rnade to recover this unique animal in portions of its historic range.
Parker, Warren T. An Overview and Guide for “Experimental Population” Designations (April 1989). [19 pages, 12.3 Mb]This technical report has been prepared to serve as a guide for future designations of certain introduced populations of federally-listed species as “experimental populations.” Experience gained in developing such a designation for a small number of endangered red wolves has yielded ideas and recommendations not only in format but also in practical application. The value of the experimental population designation is significant from a practical standpoint and in controversial situations may prove to be the element that makes possible a successful reintroduction effort.
Parker, Warren T. Red Wolf Taxonomy: A Review (September 1999). [18 pages, 6.1 Mb]The mammalian genus Canis has been noted for many years for problems regarding definitions of taxonomic classification. Many investigators have been frustrated because chromosome number and structure are constant throughout the genus. This report is prepared to provide an updated assessment of the more significant literature that discusses the taxonomy of the red woif (Canis rufus).
Esher, Robert J., and Simons, Ted. Red Wolf Propagatio on Horn Island, Mississippi: Red Wolf Ecological Studies (June 1990). [36 pages, 9.1 Mb]The red wolf (Canis rufus) propagation proiect in Mississippi has exceeded expectations. A pair of wolves was placed in an enclosure on Horn Island on 10 January 1989. The adults quickly acclimated to their new surroundings. They were fed dried dog food and game supplied by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks. The female gave birth to three male and four female pups on 7 May. All nine wolves were released into the wild on 31 July.
Parker, Warren T. A Proposal to Reintroduce the Red Wolf into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (October 1990). [35 pages, 12 Mb]Efforts to reestablish the red wolf (Canis rufus) into portions of its historic range are consistent with Congressional intent as is clearly evident in the Endangered Species Act. Reestablishment of wild populations is also the cornerstone of the Red Wolf Recovery Plan. This proposal has been prepared to serve as a planning guide for a reintroduction project in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee.
Lucash, Christopher and Crawford, Barron. Experimental Release of Red Wolves into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park: April 6, 1990 – September 15, 1992 (October 1993). [15 pages, 4.9 Mb]This report is a summary of a 10-month experiment to evaluate the feasibilily of re-establishing a population of red wolves (Canis rufus) in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This experiment was a cooperative effort between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
Phillips, Michael K. Re-Establishment of Red Wolves in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina: September 14, 1987 through September 30, 1992 (January 1994). [28 pages, 13 Mb]The purpose of this report is to summarize the five-year U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service experiment to re-establish a population of red wolves (Canis rufus) in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern North Carolina.
Henry, V. Gary, Phillips, Michael K., Waddell, Will and Lewis, Thomas E. Protocol for Island Propagation Projects (March 1995). [52 pages, 31.3 Mb]This Protocol for Island Propagation Projects was developed to [document] what is expected of red wolf island propagation projects. This would include what to do when the animals are in acclimation pens, what to do when they are in the wild on the island, what reports are expected.
Henry, V. Gary and Lucash, Christopher F. Red Wolf Reintroduction Lessons Regarding Species Restoration (May 2000). [17 pages, 10.3 Mb]There are many lessons to be learned from the red wolf recovery program that might be useful in other species restoration programs, including some that probably did not come to mind as we were preparing this paper. We will list those that were perhaps most obvious and useful.